Brent Nelson
Professor and Chair
PhD in Computer Science University of Utah, 1984

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 459 CB
Phone  : 801-422-6455
Email  :

Note

 : Office hours by appt - please call or email me
Research Topics: FPGA design tools and methodologies, reconfigurable computing

Background:

Brent Nelson is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Brigham Young University and program head for the Computer Engineering program there.  He received his PhD in computer science in 1984 from the University of Utah in the area of VLSI CAD. His current research interests focus on two main areas.  The first is high-end computing applications of reconfigurable computing.  The second is CAD for the design of FPGA-based applications.  He currently serves as co-director for the NSF Center for Reconfigurable High Performance Computing (known as CHREC) and as director of the BYU site within that center.  

He is also active in international and globalization activities within the college, having created the college's Globalization Study Abroad program in 2007.  He will be leading a group of students to Nanjing this coming spring term again to study globalization and its impact on engineering and technology.  http://www.et.byu.edu/~nelson/studyAbroad2010


James Archibald
Professor
PhD University of Washington


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Office  : 451 CB
Phone  : 801-422-2598
Email  :
Research Topics: Embedded systems, computer vision, real-time systems

Background:

Dr. Archibald received the BS degree in mathematics from BYU in 1981, and MS and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of Washington in 1983 and 1987 respectively. He has been with BYU's Electrical and Computer Engineering Department since 1987.  In 1994-1995 he was a visiting professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.  Dr. Archibald's current research interests are in the areas of real-time computer vision systems and autonomous agents.  He is a member of the ACM, a member of Phi Kappa Phi, and a senior member of the IEEE.


Neal Bangerter
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Stanford University


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Office  : 437 CB
Phone  : 801-422-4869
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Research Topics: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Biomedical Imaging

Background:

Dr. Bangerter received a Bachelor's degree in Physics from U.C. Berkeley, and received Master's and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford.  He joined the BYU faculty in the fall of 2008, and holds an adjunct appointment in the Department of Radiology at the University of Utah.  Dr. Bangerter brings a variety of experience in both industry and academia to BYU.  Prior to graduate school, he spent several years as a developer for metrology software company Wilcox Associates, and then co-founded data visualization software company Visualize in 1996.  His graduate work focused on the development of new fast imaging techniques using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).  After graduate school, Dr. Bangerter held a variety of positions in industry.  He worked at management consulting firm McKinsey & Company, software maker Microsoft, and served as Vice President of Product Management for advertising technology company Reactrix. Dr. Bangerter returned to academia in 2006 as a researcher in Stanford's Radiological Sciences Laboratory.


Randy Beard
Professor
Ph.D. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 450 CB
Phone  : 801-422-8392
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Research Topics: Aerial Robotics, Unmanned Air Vehicles, Cooperative Control, Nonlinear Control

Background:

Randy Beard received the BS degree in electrical engineering from the University of Utah in 1991, the MS degree in electrical engineering in 1993, the MS degree in mathematics in 1994, and the PhD degree in electrical engineering in 1995, all from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY.  Since 1996, he has been with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Brigham Young University.  In 1997 and 1998, he was a Summer Faculty Fellow at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  In 2006 and 2007 he was a National Council Research Fellow at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, where he worked on vision based guidance and control algorithms for micro air vehicles.

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Wood Chiang
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles


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Office  : CB 452
Phone  : 801-422-6749
Email  :
Research Topics: RF/Analog/Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuits

Background:

Please visit the group site for the most up-to-date information.

 

Shiuh-hua Wood Chiang received his B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada in 2007, the M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine in 2009, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2013. He was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Communication Circuits Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2013. From 2013 to 2014 he was a Senior Design Engineer in the RFIC design group in Qualcomm, developing low-power circuits for Bluetooth tranceivers. He joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Brigham Young University in 2014 as an Assistant Professor. His research interests include RF/analog/mixed-signal integrated circuits for biomedical devices and communication systems. Prof. Chiang received the Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2011 and 2012.


Douglas Clifford
Adjunct Faculty
MSEE , MBA Stanford U, Colorado State


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Office  : 433 CB
Phone  : 801-422-3062
Email  :
Research Topics: Engineering Management

Background:

Began my educational journey at Duke University. but following a two year LDS mission to Scotland ended up completing my undergraduate work at BYU.  Immediately went into a MSEE program at Stanford while working at Standford Park in California.  Decided to focus more on the management side of engineering and entered into a MBA program at Santa Clara University in California, but ended up completing the degree in Colorado following a change of location with HP.  Spent 28 years with HP, 25 in management.  Took an early retirement in 1996 when HP decided to phase out my disc storage division, and took a job as VP, CTO of IOMEGA Corp.  Following a couple of wild years left IOMEGA and began consulting in Corporate Development.  Got involved with BYU Engineering College helping out with Strategic Planning, which led to the development of the Senior Project Course for the ECEn department.  Taught the project management lectures for the Senior project ever since 1999, with the exception of 3 years when my wife, Sharon and I presided over the Wisconsin Milwaukee Mission. 

In 2005 got involved in local government and for the last 6 years have served as the Mayor of Pleasant View, Utah a small community of 8000 in Northern Utah. 

 

 


David Comer
Professor
Ph.D. Washington State University


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Office  : 441 CB
Phone  : 801 422-4015
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Research Topics: Semiconductor devices

Background:

David J. Comer received the BSEE degree from San Jose State, the MSEE degree from the University of California (Berkeley), and the PhD degree from Washington State University.  While attending school, he worked at IBM Advanced System Development Division in San Jose where he helped develop a voice-controlled adding machine demonstrated at the Seattle World Fair.  He taught at San Jose State University, the University of Idaho, and the University of Calgary (Canada) before becoming Dean of Engineering at California State University, Chico.  He joined the BYU faculty as a full professor in 1981.  Dr. Comer was given the Professional Achievement Award at CSU and has won several teaching awards at BYU including the Karl G. Maeser Excellence in Teaching Award.  He has consulted for IBM, Lawrence Livermore Nuclear Lab, and Intel.  He is the author of 12 textbooks in circuit design and holds eight US patents.  He does research in the areas of integrated circuit filter design, low power operational amplifiers, and high-frequency communication circuits.  Dr. Comer is a Fellow of the IEEE.


Aaron Hawkins
Professor
B.S. Caltech; Ph.D. UC Santa Barbara


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Office  : 437 CB
Phone  : 801-422-8693
Email  :
Research Topics: Optofluidics, Optoelectronics, Integrated Optics, Semiconductor Devices, Lab-on-a-Chip, Micro and Nanofabrication

Background:

Aaron Hawkins earned his bachelor’s degree in applied physics from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in 1994 and his PhD in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1998. He was a cofounder of Terabit Technology, Santa Barbara, California, and later worked as an engineer at CIENA, Linthicum, Maryland, and Intel. He has been a professor at BYU since 2002, where he is the director of the Integrated Microfabrication Laboratory. He is a member of the IEEE, the Optical Society of America, and the American Physical Society and serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics and on program committees for Photonics West and CLEO. He has authored or coauthored over 200 technical papers and is the co-editor of the Optofluidics Handbook, a defining text on the new field of optofluidics.


Brad Hutchings
Professor
Ph.D University of Utah


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Office  : 446 CB
Phone  : (801) 422-2667
Email  :
Hours 1pm - 2pm


Note

 : or by appointment.
Research Topics: Reconfigurable Computing, FPGA Architecture, Design Productivity

Background:

Brad Hutchings received his PhD in Computer Science at the University of Utah in 1992 and is currently a professor at Brigham Young University (BYU). He established the Reconfigurable Computing Laboratory at BYU in 1993. During 1998, Dr. Hutchings was a visiting scholar at HP Labs in Bristol England where he was part of a group that designed and studied reconfigurable devices for portable appliances. From 2003 - 2007, he worked as a director at Tabula, a Bay-Area startup that he helped to found. He has published widely in the reconfigurable-computing community and regularly consults with industry. He serves on the committees of many of the conferences related to reconfigurable computing and FPGAs. His research interests are in programmable devices and architectures, tool flows, debugging strategies, and parallel computation.


Brian Jeffs
Professor
Ph.D. University of Southern California, 1989

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 457 CB
Phone  : 801-422-3062
Email  :
Hours Mon,Wed 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Research Topics: Digital Signal Processing for Radio Astronomy, Multiple Antenna Wireless Communications, and Digital Image Restoration and Reconstruction

Background:

Brian D. Jeffs received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Brigham Young University in 1978 and 1982 respectively. He received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Southern California in 1989, also in electrical engineering. Since 1990 he has been in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Brigham Young University and is currently a professor. He lectures in the areas of digital signal processing, digital image processing, and circuits.


Michael Jensen
Professor
Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 452 CB
Phone  : 801-422-5736
Email  :
Research Topics: Wireless Communications, Propagation, RF Circuit Design, Antennas

Background:

Prof. Michael Jensen received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Brigham Young University in 1990 and 1991, respectively, and the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1994. Since 1994, he has been at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at BYU where he is currently a Professor. His research interests include antennas and propagation for communications, signal processing, microwave circuit design,and antenna design.

Dr. Jensen has been the Department Graduate Coordinator and Department Chair. Professionally, he has been the Editor-in-Chief and an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, Associate Editor for IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, Chair and Member of the Joint Meetings Committee for the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, Member of the Administrative Committee for this same society, and Vice-Chair or Technical Program Chair for eight different symposia. He was awarded the H. A. Wheeler paper award in the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation in 2002 and the best student paper award at the 1994 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation. He was elevated to the grade of IEEE Fellow in 2008.


D. J. Lee
Professor
Ph.D. Texas Tech University, 1990


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Office  : 453 CB
Phone  : 801 422-5923
Email  :
Research Topics: Medical Imaging, Robotic Vision, Machine Vision Applications

Background:

Dr. D. J. Lee (李大捷) received his B.S.E.E. from National Taiwan University of Science and Technology in 1984, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Texas Tech University in 1987 and 1990, respectively, and an MBA degree from Shenandoah University in 1999. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Brigham Young University. He worked in the machine vision industry for eleven years prior to joining BYU in 2001. His research work focuses on Medical informatics and imaging, shape-based pattern recognition, hardware implementation of real-time 3-D vision, and machine vision applications.


David Long
Associate Dean/Professor
Ph.D. University of Southern California, 1987


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Office  : 447 CB
Phone  : 801-422-4383
Email  :
Research Topics: microwave remote sensing, radar, SAR, signal processing, wind, ice

Background:

David Long joined the BYU ECEn faculty in August 1990 after working for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for over seven years and completing a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California.  He an associate editor for Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters.

As an essential tool for the study of the Earth microwave remote sensing can provide valuable information regarding the state of the oceans, polar regions, and vegetated areas. He is involved in interdisicplinary research and development of a variety of advanced microwave remote sensing instruments, techniques, and applications, including the development of mesoscale models of oceanic winds for use in model-based wind retrieval (estimation) algorithms from scatterometer data, resolution enhancement algorithms, sampling theory, cryosphere studies, as well as innovative SAR and scatterometer systems.  He is on a number of NASA science teams


Brian Mazzeo
Associate Professor
B.S. MIT; Ph.D. Cambridge University


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Office  : 448 CB
Phone  : 801-422-1240
Email  :
Research Topics: Electromagnetic Liquid Measurement, Dielectric Spectroscopy

Background:

Brian Mazzeo joined the faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Brigham Young University in September, 2008. He received his BS in electrical engineering from MIT in 2005 and received his PhD in 2008 from Cambridge University as a Marshall Scholar. He has worked at Motorola, the MIT Media Laboratory, and Milliken Research Corporation. Dr. Mazzeo's research focuses on the electromagnetic measurement of liquids containing biological species. He also investigates non-destructive interrogation of materials.


Gregory Nordin
Professor
Ph.D. University of Southern California

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 458 CB
Phone  : 801-422-1863
Email  :
Research Topics: Photonics, Microfluidics, Biosensors, MEMS

Background:

Prof. Nordin joined the faculty of the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department at Brigham Young University in 2005. From 1992 to 2005 he was at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) where he was the founding director of the university's Nano and Micro Devices Center, which was created as an independent research center by the University of Alabama System Board of Trustees. While director of the center, he led a group comprised of 10-15 PhD students and 5-8 full-time staff. He also created a 7,600 sq. ft. cleanroom facility for nano and microfabricated devices to pursue research activities in photonics, MEMS, microfluidics, and sensors. Prof. Nordin has led numerous large research programs, and has been principal investigator on research grants from government and industry totaling $17M. He is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award (1996) for promising young faculty, and received the UAH Outstanding Researcher Award for 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. He also received the UAH Foundation Award for Research and Creative Achievement in 2000.


David Penry
Associate Professor
PhD Princeton University, 2006


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Office  : 445 CB
Phone  : 801-422-7665
Email  :
Research Topics: Computer Architecture, Parallel Systems

Background:

Prof. David Penry received a BSE degree in Computer Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 1992, a MS degree in Computer Science and Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 1992, a MBA degree from The Ohio State University in 1994, and the PhD in Computer Science from Princeton University in 2006.  From 1994 to 2000 he was employed as a design engineer in the computer industry, working first for ACC Microelectronics (now Auctor) and later for Sun Microsystems.  Dr. Penry joined the faculty of the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department at Brigham Young University as an Assistant Professor in 2006.


Michael Rice
Jim Abrams Professor
PhD Georgia Tech, 1991

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 443 Clyde Building
Phone  : 801 422 4469
Email  :
Research Topics: Wireless Communications, Aeronautical Telemetry, Software Defined Radios

Background:

Prof. Michael Rice received his PhD from Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA in 1991. He was with Digital Transmission Systems, Inc. in Atlanta and joined the faculty at Brigham Young University in 1991 where he is currently the Jim Abrams Professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering. Professor Rice was a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellow at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory during 1994 and 1995 where he worked on land mobile satellite systems. During the 1999-2000 academic year, Professor Rice was a visiting scholar at the Communication Systems and Signal Processing Institute at San Diego State University. He was the Chair of the Communication Theory Technical Committee in the IEEE Communications Society for 2009-2010. He is currently the Technical Editor for Command, Control, and Communications and the Associate Editor-in-Chief for IEEE Transactions on Aerospace & Electronic Systems, Chair of the Signal Processing and Communications Society Chapter of the IEEE Utah Section, and an associate member of the Telemetry Group of the Range Commanders Council. 


Stephen Schultz
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 444 CB
Phone  : 801-422-1693
Email  :
Hours 9:00am - 10:00pm
2:00pm - 3:00pm

Research Topics: Optical fiber sensors, diffractive optics, integrate optics

Background:

Stephen M. Schultz received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, in 1992 and 1994, respectively. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, in 1999.  He worked at Raytheon Missile Systems from 1999-2001.  He has taught at Brigham Young University since 2002 and is currently an Associate Professor.  He has authored or coauthored over 70 publications and holds 10 patents. 

He is the co-director of the fiber devices laboratory at Brigham Young University.  His research interests are in the area of optical fiber devices with an emphasis on optical fiber based sensors.  He has developed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology for high temperature applications, strain sensing, bend sensing, and chemical sensing.  He has developed compact and high speed electronics systems for FBG sensor interrogation. 


Richard Selfridge
Professor
Ph.D. University of California, Davis


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Office  : 454 CB
Phone  : 801-422-6313
Email  :
Hours Mon,Wed,Thu 1:30pm - 3:30pm

Research Topics: In-fiber devices, Electromagnetic field sensors

Background:

Dr. Selfridge is currently a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Brigham Young University. From 1983 through 1987 Dr. Selfridge was a member of the faculty in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at California State University in Sacramento.  He has taught a wide variety of courses including classes in circuits, electronics, electromagnetics, optics, and solid state devices. He has focused his research on the creation of optical devices within an optical fiber. He along with students and collaborators has developed a novel technique for removing a portion of the core of a D-type optical fiber and replacing it with an optically active material. In addition, Dr. Selfridge’s group has developed techniques to create surface relief gratings on the flat surface of D-fibers to form fiber input/output couplers and Bragg gratings within the fiber environment.Dr. Richard Selfridge received the following degrees B.S. of Physics, 1978, from California State University, Sacramento,  MS in Electrical Engineering, 1980, from University of California, Davis, and Ph.D in Electrical Engineering, 1984, from University of California, Davis. He is senior member of the IEEE and a member of SPIE. He currently serves as the chapter adviser for the Society of Professional Hispanic Engineers.


Daniel Smalley
Assistant Professor
Ph.D. MIT


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Office  : 449 CB
Phone  : 801-422-4343
Email  :
Research Topics: Integrated Optics for Holovideo

Background:

Late on a stormy night (Friday the 13th it was!) a shrill cry pierced the darkness and Daniel Smalley was born.  Young Daniel was a farmhand by day and an intrepid experimenter by night.  He once used an old metal bucket, some sand and a computer fan to construct an aluminum furnace for melting pop-cans and old screen doors into machine tool parts.  He also built a number of circuits, a methane digester, a wind-powered electrolysis machine, a laser and a number of fine origami creations of various shapes and sizes.  He experimented a great deal with holography, and for this reason was led to attend MIT where he earned a B.S., M.Eng, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees while working to create the world's first low-cost holographic video monitor.  Now as a newly minted BYU professor, he is continuing his work in electroholography by fabricating new waveguide-based modulators.  Professor Smalley aspires to create large, high resolution, interactive holographic and volumetric displays.  He is also part of collaborations pursuing novel brain probes and tractor beam technologies.


Wynn Stirling
Dean of Graduate Studies/Professor
Ph. D. Stanford University, 1983

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 105 FPH
Phone  : 801-422-7669
Email  :
Research Topics: Multi-agent decision and control theory

Background:

Dr. Stirling is currently the Dean of Graduate Studies and a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Dr. Stirling teaches stochastic processes, control theory and signal processing. His current research interests include non-traditional decision theory, estimation theory, and control theory.  He received his BA (Honors) in mathematics from the University of Utah in 1969, his MS in electrical engineering from the University of Utah in 1971, and his PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1983.  From 1972 to 1975, he was employed by Rockwell International Corporation, Anaheim CA and Hill Air force Base, UT, and from 1975 to 1984 he worked for ESL Inc., Sunnyvale, CA.  He joined the faculty of Brigham Young University in 1984.


Karl Warnick
Professor
Ph.D. Brigham Young University


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Office  : 459 CB
Phone  : 801-422-1732
Email  :
Research Topics: Electromagnetics, Antennas and Arrays, Numerical Analysis, Forward and Inverse Scattering, RF and Microwave Systems

Background:

Karl F. Warnick received the B.S. degree (magna cum laude) with University Honors and the Ph.D. degree from Brigham Young University (BYU), Provo, UT, in 1994 and 1997, respectively. From 1998 to 2000, he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Center for Computational Electromagnetics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 2000, he has been a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at BYU, where he is currently an Associate Professor. He was a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Outstanding Faculty Member award for Electrical and Computer Engineering (2005), and the BYU Young Scholar Award (2007). In 2005 and 2007, he was a Visiting Professor at the Technische Universität München, Germany. Dr. Warnick has published many scientific articles and conference papers on electromagnetic theory, numerical methods, remote sensing, antenna applications, phased arrays, biomedical devices, and inverse scattering, and is the author of the books Problem Solving in Electromagnetics, Microwave Circuits, and Antenna Design for Communications Engineering (Artech House, 2006) with Peter Russer and Numerical Analysis for Electromagnetic Integral Equations (Artech House, 2008).


Doran Wilde
Associate Professor
Ph.D. Computer Science Oregon State University, 1995


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Office  : 455 CB
Phone  : 801-422-8739
Email  :


Background:

Dr. Wilde joined the BYU faculty in 1995.  He has taught a wide range of computer and electrical engineering courses and has been involved in new computer engineering course development. He has been actively engaged in research in the fields of computer arithmetic, application specific systems and architectures, and autonomous vehicles. Dr. Wilde is a senior member of the IEEE.  He is the father of seven children and sixteen grandchildren.

View Doran Wilde's profile on LinkedIn Doran Wilde


Mike Wirthlin
Professor
Ph.D. Brigham Young University, 1997

Curriculum Vitae

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Office  : 442 CB
Phone  : 801-422-7601
Email  :
Research Topics: Reconfigurable Computing, Fault Tolerant Computing, FPGA Architectures and Tools, FPGA Reliability

Background:

Michael J. Wirthlin receieved a B.S. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Brigham Young University (BYU) in 1992. Following his degree, he worked at as a design engineer at a start-up in Salt Lake City designing high-performance sound processing circuits using FPGAs. He returned to BYU to pursue research in dynamically reconfigurable computing and completed his Ph.D. in 1997. After completing his Ph.D.,he worked as a Staff Research Engineer in the Systems Architecture Laboratory at National Semiconductor Corporation in Santa Clara, CA. At National, he participated in efforts to model and specify large, single-chip systems including the single-chip PC.  He returned to BYU in 1999 as a member of the faculty and is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at BYU. His research interests include reconfigurable computing, FPGA architectures, FPGA reliability, high-level synthesis, and computer-aided design for application-specific computing.


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